My washer is leaking

  • Your fill hoses might need tightening at either end.

  • Poor draining in the standpipe causes the sudsy water to back up and overflow, making it look like a washer problem when, in fact, it was a plumbing problem.

  • Older Maytag Dependable Care washers can have problems with the tub water injector tube leaking.

  • A pump might be leaking. You gotta open it up and see.
    On Whirlpool/Kenmore direct drive washers, the pump is down in front and you’ll need to remove the cabinet to check it out.
    On old-style GE/Hotpoint washers, the pump is down in back and you’ll need to pull off that back panel to check it out.
    The pump on Maytag washers is down in front and you’ll need to pull the front panel off to check it out.

  • The tub might be leaking. How can you tell? Right, you gotta open ‘er up and look at it. Crystal balls don’t work too good.

  • The new-style GE’s are bad for spin-during-agitate problem. This makes a mess because it sloshes water out of the tub all over the floor. The only cure is to replace the brake package but, you might as well go ahead and replace the whole transmission. We have units for sale with warranty that often costs less than the parts

  • The fill valve has crud caught in it making it stick open. Replace the fill valve and install sediment filtration on household water supply. 

  • Very restricted water flow through the valve. This problem is unique to the older GE/Hotpoint washers. Low water flow will cause the water from the valve’s discharge hose to run back up the hose by capillary action and down to the floor.

 

The washer doesn’t spin or, if it does, it’s real sluggish.

  • No spin at all: the lid switch is bad. You test it with your meter for continuity.

  • In the Whirlpool/Kenmore washers, a common problem is that the lid plunger stops making contact with the lid switch. Use a pen to manually press the lid switch actuator (with the lid up). If the washer spins…well, you know the rest.

  • Older (belt-drive) Whirlpool/Kenmores: the spin solenoid is burned out or has cut wires. Ohm out that solenoid (20-30 ohms) and test with a test cord. Make sure the wires are intact by giving them a little tug. If this is OK, you may need to adjust/replace the basket drive.

  • Newer (direct-drive) Whirlpool/Kenmores: worn out direct drive coupler.

  • The drive belt has had it. Look for excessive glazing on the sides of the belt or cracks in the power side of the belt. On Maytags, replace the belt set if they look glazed or shiny on the sides even though the belts may look OK otherwise. Belts on other brands will be more obviously bad.

  • Timer is fried. On older timers, it’s sometimes possible to run an external jumper to replace the bad internal contacts. Usually, however, the entire timer must be replaced. The only way to confirm is to use your meter and wiring diagram.

 

It fills OK, it just won’t agitate.

  • Drive belt could be worn out–see above.

  • On the Whirlpool/Kenmore dual action agitator, the agitator dog cam assembly or drive spindle could be worn out. If the agitator just wobbles around when you turn it by hand, you need to replace the dog cam set.

  • The timer contacts for the agitate cycle could be bad. 

  • On belt-driven Whirlpool/Kenmores: wig-wag plunger/lifter or transmission mode lever could be worn out. You’ll need to look at the action of the agitate solenoid when the machine is in the agitation part of the cycle. If the plunger/lifter slips off the transmission mode lever, replace either the plunger/lifter or the mode lever, as appropriate.

  • On Maytags : the lid switch could be fried. (Other brands will still agitate with a bad lid switch.)

  • Pressure switch is bad. You’ll need to ohm out the contacts on it.

  • The air tube connecting to the pressure switch is pinched or pulled off

 

It doesn’t agitate or spin.

  • Broken or worn drive belts.

  • Newer (direct-drive) Whirlpool/Kenmores: worn out direct drive coupler.

  • The drive belt has had it. Look for excessive glazing on the sides of the belt or cracks in the power side of the belt. On Maytags, replace the belt set if they look glazed or shiny on the sides even though the belts may look OK otherwise. Belts on other brands will be more obviously bad.

  • On Whirlpool/Kenmore direct-drive machines: worn direct drive coupler.

  • Motor is bad.

  • No power at washer electrical outlet

 

It is not draining

  • Pump is bad. If it’s a belt-driven pump, you can tell by feeling how stiff it is to turn. For electric pumps, hook up a test cord and run it. Pull drain hose and watch discharge stream. If stream fluctuates or is pathetic, replace the pump.

  • Again, worn drive belt. In this case, washer won’t spin either (or will have a sluggish spin).

  • The drain hose is clogged. Pull drain hose and watch discharge stream. A good discharge stream will have the same diameter as the hose itself.

 

It is noisy and vibrating alot.

  • Try leveling the washer. Check for play along the diagonal corners of the washer cabinet by applying downward pressure. If there is any play at all, the washer will shake during spin and the legs must be leveled.

  • Try placing reinforcing pads or pieces of plywood on the floor under the washer.

  • On Maytag top loaders: worn damper pads.

  • On Whirlpool/Kenmore direct-drive machines: worn snubber pads.

 

The clothes are still wet at the end of the cycle and take forever to dry.

  • The washer’s not spinning (although it still pumps out).

 

That washer puts spots all over my clothes.

  • Transmission oil leaked back into the tub. This is most common with the older GE/Hotpoint washers. Test by applying solvent to a section of a spotted garment. If the spots come off only with solvent but not with soap and water, then they are oil spots. If you do have a GE/Hotpoint washer, take it to the dump and buy a Whirlpool with a warranty from our showroom .

 

The washer ate holes in my clothes

  • Try using less bleach.

  • Your clothes are getting caught under the agitator. Feel under bottom of agitator for rough spots that can catch clothing.

  • You’re using too little water for the load size you’re running. Look, if you want to save water, get a front-loading machine.

 

Clothes are still soapy at the end of the cycle.

  • Your cold water valve is clogged with sediment. Rinse is done with cold water. No cold water, no rinse.

  • Fried timer contact. Less likely but possible. Check the valve first, Hoser.

  • Itd be a good idea to check your water hardness, too.

 

I don’t get cold water in my washer.

  • Sediment has gotten into the valve from the household water supply and is blocking the flow. Replace the valve.

  • Cold water hand valve at wall turned off

 

The washer is completely dead.

  • No power at the outlet

  • Timer is bad.

  • Washer went off-balance and tripped the off-balance switch. Open washer lid, redistribute the load and re-start the washer. 

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Mt Pleasant

 

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